Animal Biodiversity and Evolution
3/5

Animal
Biodiversity
and Evolution

Phylogeny and
Phylogeography
of Mammals lab

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

José Castresana CSIC Research Scientist

3/5
José Castresana - CSIC Research Scientist
Phylogeny and Phylogeography of Mammals lab Team
Phylogeny and Phylogeography of Mammals lab

MEMBERS OF THE GROUP (Active in 2018)

Predoctoral Researcher Alfonso Balmori

Research Technician Lídia Escoda


HIGHLIGHTS OF 2018

Our main goal is the application of genomic analyses to the study of animal biodiversity and evolution, with specific interest in mammals. Using next-generation sequencing techniques and advanced bioinformatic tools, we are studying the population structure, kinship relationships, and connectivity patterns in some species of great conservation importance, such as the Pyrenean desman. More recently, we have also studied the diet of this species (see figure) and compared its phylogeography with that of another Iberian endemism, the Cabrera water shrew.

2018 SELECTED PUBLICATIONS

Hawlitschek, O., Fernández-González, A., Balmori-de la Puente, A., and Castresana, J. (2018). A pipeline for metabarcoding and diet analysis from fecal samples developed for a small semi-aquatic mammal. PLOS ONE 13, e0201763.

Querejeta, M., and Castresana, J. (2018). Evolutionary history of the endemic water shrew Neomys anomalus: recurrent phylogeographic patterns in semi-aquatic mammals of the Iberian Peninsula. Ecology and Evolution 8, 10138-10146.

2018 FUNDED PROJECTS

Title: Secuenciación del genoma del desmán ibérico para su aplicación en estudios de evolución poblacional y conservación.
Funded by: Plan Nacional I+D+I del Ministerio de Economía, Industria y Competitividad
Reference: CGL2017-84799-P
PI: José Castresana
Date: January 2018 - December 2020

Title: Biodiversitat Animal i Evolució.
Funded by: Generalitat de Catalunya. Grups de Recerca (SGR)
Reference: 2017-SGR-991
PI: Salvador Carranza
Date: January 2018 - December 2019

FIGURE CAPTION

We are studying the diet of the Pyrenean desman using the excrements found in its natural habitat, small mountain rivers, and applying an NGS-based metabarcoding approach. Among the most abundant prey we found are species of Ephemeroptera, Diptera, Trichoptera, Coleoptera, Plecoptera, Neuropteroida, Annelida, and Crustacea. On average, 17 different prey species were identified per excrement (Hawlitschek et al. 2018).